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EXHIBITION REVIEW: Russian Revolution: Hope, Tragedy, Myths at the British Library

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The British Library seems the perfect place to host an exhibition dedicated to the Russian Revolution. With both Marx and Lenin having worked at moments in the reading rooms of its former premises, it can be easily seen as a cradle of the Soviet experiment. Russian Revolution: Hope, Tragedy, Myths, on view till 29 August…

Denis Stolyarov | 10/05/2017
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THEATRE REVIEW: ‘Ashes Afar’ – Andrea Bortun’s corruscatingly intense anatomy of migration

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What do we mean by ‘home’? This is the central question posed by Romanian playwright Andreaa Bortun in her play Ashes Afar, recently performed in English at the Romanian Cultural Institute in London’s Belgrave Square. Bortun’s raw and uncompromising script shows us glimpses of the lives of  a migrant couple from two different cultures living…

Margaret Drummond | 17/04/2017
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KINOTEKA REVIEW: Polish Animation Classics – an existentialist feast

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Scene One: A crowd gets eaten by the roasted chickens and crabs on the banquet table. Scene Two: As a train moves, all that an onscreen silhouette of a man sees is a repetitive countryside landscape saturated with an intense green colour. Yet as soon as the man gets into the city, the landscape becomes…

Paula Erizanu | 15/04/2017
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PREVIEW: The Image Speaks: Miloš Forman and the Free Cinema Movement

‘The importance of ordinary people, the everyday, belief in artistic freedom and the rejection of established cinematic norms are some of the principles common to the early work of Czech director Milos Forman and the British Free Cinema movement. This programme, jointly curated with Close-Up and screening from original 16mm and 35mm prints, marks Miloš…

Robin Ashenden | 09/04/2017
The Last Stage

KINOTEKA REVIEW: ‘The Last Stage’ – Wanda Jakubowska’s 1948 retelling of the Holocaust has lost none of its shocking narrative power

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Wanda Jakubowska’s The Last Stage (Ostatni Etap) is one of the world’s earliest feature films about the Holocaust, premiering in Poland as early as March 1948. It’s also a personal narrative: partly based on Jakubowska’s own experiences at Birkenau women’s camp at Auschwitz, The Last Stage chronicles life in the camp from a personal angle, filmed on…

Julia Secklehner | 02/04/2017