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EXHIBITION REVIEW: Black Hole Generation: ‘The Kings are Back’ – Returning empty-handed?

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Black Hole Generation (BHG) is a Prague-based collective of young artists, whose core members, David Krňanský, Martin Lukáč and Julius Reichel, are now showing eighteen works at London’s small Dot Project Gallery. Having studied together at UMPRUM, Prague’s Academy for Arts and Design, one of the most innovative institutions in the country, BHG undoubtedly aims…

Julia Secklehner | 24/02/2017
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FILM REVIEW: ‘Neon’ (2014) – Eric Bednarski’s electric account of Warsaw’s City Lights

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In this award-winning documentary, director Eric Bednarski traces the history of Poland’s capital through the city’s neon lights – merging design, politics and history in an ambitiously innovative project. It’s a retelling of Polish history, so often the subject of grand films that exploit the emotional weight of its traumatic turns from Nazism to Stalinism.…

Julia Secklehner | 20/02/2017
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THEATRE REVIEW: Chekhov’s ‘The Seagull’ (Hemar Theatre) at Ognisko Polskie

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Ognisko Polskie, the Polish Hearth Club, is an exquisite venue: glistening chandeliers please the eye, red velvet lines the elegant staircases; this quiet haven in South Kensington is full of Old World charm. Last Saturday night, a traditional version of Chekhov’s play The Seagull was produced here. Set on a lake estate in Imperial Russia,…

Andreea Scridon | 12/02/2017
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CONCERT REVIEW: Ukraine: An Artist’s View – a captivating act of cultural diplomacy

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This was the premiere of Olesya Zdorovetska’s launch of her project, Telling Sounds. Sitting down, I immediately discerned a sprinkling of Eastern European accents, complimenting the authentic feel of Dash Arts. The stage was minimalistic; we were left to focus on Olesya and her Tsymbaly. Zdorovetska, clad in a vibrant red top, was enthralling. It…

Alexandra de Stanford Wallitt | 28/01/2017
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THEATRE REVIEW: Chekhov’s ‘Three Sisters’ at the Union Theatre – simplified production deserves the benefit of the doubt

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Tracy Letts’ adaptation of Chekhov’s 1900 play – directed by Phil Wilmott – gives an English, deadpan intonation to Russian humor. The expansive, often ironic comedy characteristic of Chekhov’s plays persists even though Letts has cut and altered considerable portions of the original text. The layout of the Union Theatre in Southwark, which has the…

Andreea Scridon | 27/01/2017