dangerous acts

‘Dangerous Acts Starring the Unstable Elements of Belarus’: review by Jesse Kirkwood

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‘Belarus is not sexy. Sexy countries have oil, gas, diamonds, sea, mountains … Belarus has only people.’ This is the problem faced by Belarusians seeking to attract attention to their plight in Europe’s last dictatorship. With countless other cases of inequity and human rights abuses occurring daily across the globe, why should people care about…

Jesse Kirkwood | 12/08/2014
georgia celebration

Robin Ashenden reviews Tbilisi Georgian Restaurant on Holloway Road

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Russia may have had its issues with Georgia over the centuries, but rarely with Georgian food, many of the most popular restaurants in Moscow hailing from the Caucasus. In the Soviet time Georgia was the supreme provider of fruit and vegetables for the whole Empire: aubergines, citrus fruit, peppers and walnuts all grew here, and…

Robin Ashenden | 12/08/2014

Esther Harper reviews ‘Into the Whirlwind’ by Eugenia Ginzburg (Persephone Books)

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Behind-the-scenes accounts of the lives of normal people in Stalin’s Russia are few and far between, so it’s a privilege to have read Eugenia Ginzburg’s memoirs of life as a victim of the period. Into the Whirlwind is a sobering and harrowing testament of one woman’s experience in the prison camp system, and it fills…

Esther Harper | 09/08/2014
Photo by Tomas Moudry

Jonathan Karstadt reviews ‘4’ by Prague supergroup Eggnoise

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Since its formation in 1994, the Czech band Eggnoise has defied classification with its frenetic genre-hopping. With the ability to evoke Radiohead, Donald Byrd and Simon & Garfunkel over the course of a single record, the band’s first three albums What a World (2003), Albumen (2007) and Yolk (2010) are characterised by relentless musical experimentation…

Jonathan Karstadt | 08/08/2014
DakhaBrakha by Lyudmila Dobrynina

Eugenia Ellanskaya reviews Ukraine’s DakhaBrakha at Rich Mix.

Dash Arts continue to delight their audiences with musical talents from Eastern Europe as part of their latest regional focus. Last week they hit some sensitive strings by bringing to London a musical quartet from the very heart of the European crisis. The Ukrainian band Dakha Brakha is an eclectic musical phenomenon that seeks to…

Eugenia Ellanskaya | 06/08/2014

Ian Mole reviews Miroslav Penkov’s ‘East of the West’.

Miroslav Penkov was born in Gabrovo, Bulgaria in 1982, seven years before the fall of the Communist regime, but he moved to the United States when he was eighteen and now lives in Texas.  This collection, which he wrote in English, comes in at just over two hundred pages and is composed of eight tales. After reading the dust-jacket…

Ian Mole | 02/08/2014
ruth maclennan the future is ours

Crimea and Odessa: Valeriya Stepanuyk reviews Ruth Maclennan’s New Short Films

On July 14 I had the privilege of being present at one of the last events of the Pushkin House summer programme – Video Art & Discussion on Crimea. Artist Ruth Maclennan, inspired by the works of Chekhov, Tsvetaeva and Tolstoi, decided to get out there herself and live through some of the experiences described…

Valeriya Stepanuyk | 30/07/2014

Caitlin Tymukas Spence reviews ‘Transport from Paradise’ (Zbyněk Brynych, 1962)

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Transport from Paradise  (1962) is a vivid look at life in a Czech Ghetto, and an account of the life of Arnost Lustig who spent time at Terezinstadt camp-ghetto before being sent to Auschwitz. Pairing the atrocious treatment of the Jews with scenes from Nazi propaganda films, we see how the world was deceived as to the…

Caitlin Spence | 22/07/2014
Radik Tyulyush (2)

Eugenia Ellanskaya reviews Radik Tyulyush’s concert with Dash Art

Radik Tyulyush is a world-renowned throat singer. If the concept of throat singing sounds unfamiliar to you, then you are in for a great musical discovery, all the way from the depths of Inner Asia. Here, in the small Republic of Tuva near Mongolia,  every other person knows about the unusual skill. Last week the…

Eugenia Ellanskaya | 20/07/2014