DakhaBrakha by Lyudmila Dobrynina

Eugenia Ellanskaya reviews Ukraine’s DakhaBrakha at Rich Mix.

Dash Arts continue to delight their audiences with musical talents from Eastern Europe as part of their latest regional focus. Last week they hit some sensitive strings by bringing to London a musical quartet from the very heart of the European crisis. The Ukrainian band Dakha Brakha is an eclectic musical phenomenon that seeks to…

Eugenia Ellanskaya | 06/08/2014

Ian Mole reviews Miroslav Penkov’s ‘East of the West’.

Miroslav Penkov was born in Gabrovo, Bulgaria in 1982, seven years before the fall of the Communist regime, but he moved to the United States when he was eighteen and now lives in Texas.  This collection, which he wrote in English, comes in at just over two hundred pages and is composed of eight tales. After reading the dust-jacket…

Ian Mole | 02/08/2014
ruth maclennan the future is ours

Crimea and Odessa: Valeriya Stepanuyk reviews Ruth Maclennan’s New Short Films

On July 14 I had the privilege of being present at one of the last events of the Pushkin House summer programme – Video Art & Discussion on Crimea. Artist Ruth Maclennan, inspired by the works of Chekhov, Tsvetaeva and Tolstoi, decided to get out there herself and live through some of the experiences described…

Valeriya Stepanuyk | 30/07/2014

Caitlin Tymukas Spence reviews ‘Transport from Paradise’ (Zbyněk Brynych, 1962)

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Transport from Paradise  (1962) is a vivid look at life in a Czech Ghetto, and an account of the life of Arnost Lustig who spent time at Terezinstadt camp-ghetto before being sent to Auschwitz. Pairing the atrocious treatment of the Jews with scenes from Nazi propaganda films, we see how the world was deceived as to the…

Caitlin Spence | 22/07/2014
Radik Tyulyush (2)

Eugenia Ellanskaya reviews Radik Tyulyush’s concert with Dash Art

Radik Tyulyush is a world-renowned throat singer. If the concept of throat singing sounds unfamiliar to you, then you are in for a great musical discovery, all the way from the depths of Inner Asia. Here, in the small Republic of Tuva near Mongolia,  every other person knows about the unusual skill. Last week the…

Eugenia Ellanskaya | 20/07/2014
cabaret hrabal

Oliver Buxton reviews ‘Cabaret Hrabal’ at the Horse Hospital

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Bohumil Hrabal, the Czech novelist, is a tenderly shared secret among those who read him. He is not nearly as well known as Kundera, his contemporary, but created a world just as intoxicating: one of marginal, at times humiliated people whose constricted outer lives – as waiters, railway men, paper-pulpers – masks the boundlessness of…

Oliver Buxton | 14/07/2014

Ian Mole reviews Blaga Dimitrova’s ‘The Last Rock Eagle’

Blaga Dimitrova (1922-2003) was a major figure in Twentieth Century literature and politics, and is perhaps Bulgaria’s most famous poet. She was an outspoken critic of the Communist regime in her country in the Seventies and Eighties and when democracy was finally restored in 1989, she was a leading light against the attempts of the…

Ian Mole | 14/07/2014
poster_leemiller_clean

Robin Ashenden reviews ‘Lee Miller: Romanian Rhapsody’ at the Romanian Cultural Centre

For any more-than-casual visitor, it’s always interesting to see what others have made of Romania.  The country is like nowhere else in Europe – to a visitor it’s more hospitable, more generous, and, for all its bafflingly unspoken codes, apparently less hemmed in by rules and regulations. A note of the surreal hangs over everything:…

Robin Ashenden | 14/07/2014