Radik Tyulyush (2)

Eugenia Ellanskaya reviews Radik Tyulyush’s concert with Dash Art

Radik Tyulyush is a world-renowned throat singer. If the concept of throat singing sounds unfamiliar to you, then you are in for a great musical discovery, all the way from the depths of Inner Asia. Here, in the small Republic of Tuva near Mongolia,  every other person knows about the unusual skill. Last week the…

Eugenia Ellanskaya | 20/07/2014
cabaret hrabal

Oliver Buxton reviews ‘Cabaret Hrabal’ at the Horse Hospital

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Bohumil Hrabal, the Czech novelist, is a tenderly shared secret among those who read him. He is not nearly as well known as Kundera, his contemporary, but created a world just as intoxicating: one of marginal, at times humiliated people whose constricted outer lives – as waiters, railway men, paper-pulpers – masks the boundlessness of…

Oliver Buxton | 14/07/2014

Ian Mole reviews Blaga Dimitrova’s ‘The Last Rock Eagle’

Blaga Dimitrova (1922-2003) was a major figure in Twentieth Century literature and politics, and is perhaps Bulgaria’s most famous poet. She was an outspoken critic of the Communist regime in her country in the Seventies and Eighties and when democracy was finally restored in 1989, she was a leading light against the attempts of the…

Ian Mole | 14/07/2014
poster_leemiller_clean

Robin Ashenden reviews ‘Lee Miller: Romanian Rhapsody’ at the Romanian Cultural Centre

For any more-than-casual visitor, it’s always interesting to see what others have made of Romania.  The country is like nowhere else in Europe – to a visitor it’s more hospitable, more generous, and, for all its bafflingly unspoken codes, apparently less hemmed in by rules and regulations. A note of the surreal hangs over everything:…

Robin Ashenden | 14/07/2014
diary for my children janos and juli

Robin Ashenden reviews ‘Diary for My Children’ (Márta Mészáros, 1982)

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Diary for My Children is the first in Márta Mészáros’s autobiographical Napló trilogy, which also includes Diary for My Loves (1987)  and Diary for My Mother and Father (1990).  Banned for a time in Mészáros’s native Hungary, it was first shown in Britain in 1984. Now it’s released as a single work on DVD, the arrival…

Robin Ashenden | 07/07/2014
Sigrid Rausing

David Rothenberg reviews Sigrid Rausing’s ‘Everything is Wonderful’ (Grove Press 2014)

The Story You Need to Survive Sigrid Rausing’s first book on her time spent in the once-Swedish peninsula Noarootsi in coastal Estonia was The End of a Collective Farm: History, Memory and Identity in Post-Soviet Estonia (Oxford 2004).  Based on her dissertation in the field of anthropology, it is a fine academic work on the early transition from…

David Rothenberg | 05/07/2014
red forest woman

Belarus Free Theatre: Molly Flynn interviews ‘Red Forest’ director Nicolai Khalezin

Nicolai Khalezin is the director of the Belarus Free Theatre’s newest production Red Forest. He co-founded the company along with his wife Natalia Kaliada and their collaborator Vladmir Shcherban in 2005. In 2011 Khalezin, Kaliada, and their family were granted political asylum in the UK. Since that time they have continued to produce new work…

Molly Flynn | 28/06/2014

Teresa Wiggleworth-Baker visits the London Tatar Sabantuy Festival 2014

On Sunday 8th June the third Tatar Sabantuy took place in the courtyard of the Wilkins buildings at UCL. A Sabantuy is a traditional summer festival which is celebrated every summer in Tatarstan, an autonomous republic situated within the political framework of the Russian Federation. Similarly, the festival is celebrated in Bashkortostan, a neighbouring republic…

Teresa Wigglesworth-Baker | 28/06/2014