sun in a net hands

Esther Harper reviews Štefan Uher’s ‘The Sun in a Net’ (1962)

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Stefan Uher’s 1962 ‘The Sun in a Net’ (Slkno v sieti) shines an important light on a national cinema which is often overlooked. Slovak cinema finds itself dwarfed and overshadowed by the Czech variety, the geographical and historical proximity of the two countries often making it difficult for Slovak cinema to distinguish its own identity.…

Esther Harper | 07/06/2014
Corneliu Popescu

‘Buried’ A short story from Romania, by Mike Ormsby

43 Celsius: the hottest day of the year so far. I decide to walk up town, just to see how it feels. No point hiding indoors, better to adapt, that’s how humans survive. Plus, there is something I need to do – find out about Romanian writers. The Internet helps, but not much; Wikipedia offers…

Mike Ormsby | 07/06/2014
Deyan Enev, photo by Justine Тoms, via Wikimedia Commons

Ian Mole reviews ‘Circus Bulgaria’ by Deyan Enev

                  Circus Bulgaria is a collection of fifty short stories, some of them less than two pages long and many of them like postcards from a place that’s way past its best, the protagonists often struggling to survive in difficult circumstances. Although there is no definite time-reference…

Ian Mole | 07/06/2014
'Kavarma' - photo by Jeroen Kransen (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Ian Mole reviews Bolyary Bulgarian Restaurant, Palmer’s Green

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Bulgarian cuisine is a mix of European and near-Eastern influences, especially Turkish. Being a fertile country with a wide range of vegetables and fruits, it’s famous for the variety of its tasty salads. With its long coastline, fish and seafood dishes are also popular. Other distinctive items are cold and hot soups, a lot of…

Ian Mole | 04/06/2014
'My Day'

Jonathan Karstadt reviews Viktor Popkov: Genius of the Russian Soul at Somerset House

When westerners think of post-war Soviet art, they probably picture works expressing the grand Socialist Realist vision most impressively realised by Yevgeniy Vuchetich’s monumental The Motherland Calls statue in Volgograd. What probably doesn’t come to mind are colourful and expressionist portraits, dream-like works immersed in lavish symbolism, and brooding self-portraits that tackle poignant questions about…

Jonathan Karstadt | 02/06/2014
illumination bw picture

Krysztof Zanussi’s ‘Illumination’ (1972) reviewed by Stephen Mason

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Illumination follows the story of a young student physicist named Franciszek Retman (Stanislaw Latallo) as he struggles to find his place in the world. Coming of age in the 1960s, Franciszek is an intelligent young man whose career as a physicist looks bright. However this is put on hold early on when his girlfriend, Malgorzata (Malgorzata Pritulak),…

Stephen Mason | 31/05/2014
ZIC ZAC 2-1

ZIC ZAC: Romanian Dance Group interviewed by Robin Ashenden

‘Zic Zac’  is the brainchild of Romanian-Hungarian dancer and choreographer Andrea Gavriliu, who developed the show at college with her friends Stefan Lupu and Gabriel Costin. The show presents an intriguing face-off between a man and a woman, following them through the many different phases of a love-affair, and it opened to considerable acclaim in…

Robin Ashenden | 29/05/2014
trafacka

Jonathan Karstadt reviews Trafačka: Temple of Freedom at Red Gallery, Shoreditch

The Trafačka artistic collective have been running a countercultural art gallery in the Libeň district of Prague (once home to subversive Czech writer Bohumil Hrabal) since 2007. According to its website: “Trafačka is a creative space, a place for meeting and free expression. At Trafačka it is possible to follow the emerging trends in contemporary…

Jonathan Karstadt | 26/05/2014