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Projecting Czech History 1918 – 2018, Film Review: ‘Lost in Munich’ (Zelenka, 2015) and discussion with Vít Smetana and Peter Neville – ‘A triumph for its writer director Zelenka’

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The awarding winning Lost in Munich (Zelenka 2015) is a fast paced mix of documentary and farce.  Director Petr Zelenka takes an absurdist look at the Munich Agreement of 1938, lauded as a diplomatic victory at the time, but still seen by Czechs as a total disaster and a betrayal.  In the opening sequence newsreels of…

Alison Miller | 12/10/2018
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Polish films at Raindance Film Festival in London

‘UK Premieres and Best Discoveries 4-5 October 2018 Raindance Film Festival Vue Piccadilly 19 Lower Regent Street London SW1Y 4LR Tower. A Bright Day dir. Jagoda Szelc, Poland, 106 min BOOK NOW  In an small rural community, Kaja returns to her family after a six-year absence, during which time her daughter Nina has been raised…

Julia Secklehner | 27/09/2018
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FILM REVIEW: Licu, a Romanian story (Dumitrescu, 2018) – ‘a rainy afternoon film with glimpses of truth-telling’

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Licu, a Romanian story is a sufficiently encompassing title: personal and national anecdotes line up like neat little toy soldiers in Ana Dumitrescu’s 2018 documentary. Licu, a 92-year-old man, muses on his life in the past near-century in Romania and the memories that have come to be his primary companions. Licu’s a fine and subtle narrator:…

Andreea Scridon | 01/09/2018
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NEW RUSSIAN DRAMA WEEK: 4 contemporary Russian plays

New Russian Drama Week by Xameleon Theatre Plays from the Russian speaking world. Series of rehearsed readings. Directed by London based Russian  directors – Dmitry Turchaninnov and Alice Terekhof. 13th September – Tanya Tanya by Olga Mukhina – In English with Russian surtitles. Translated by John Freedman. Directed by Dmitry Turchaninov. 14th September – Tomorrow by Natalia…

Julia Secklehner | 29/08/2018
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Theatre Review: ‘All That Remains’ (Olesya Khromeychuk/Molodyi Teatr London, 2018) – ‘a rare chance of grasping a genuine perspective about the conflict in Ukraine’

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Molodyi Teatr London, a Ukrainian-British theatre group which has previously produced successful shows like Bloody Europeans and Penetrating Europe or Migrants Have Talent, performed the premiere of its latest play All That Remainsin Camden People’s Theatre on 30th of June. All That Remains, written by Molodyi Teatr member Olesya Khromeychuk, somewhat departs from the cabaret-like…

Iga Szczodrowska | 19/08/2018
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‘Youth on the March’ KinoKlassika Review: ‘Assa’ (Solovev, 1987) – ‘a fight to the death between young and old, corrupt and innocent’

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Assa starts with a bang: a sequence of spellbinding opening credits in lurid pink playing over footage of two drummers, skinny youths in tatty clothes and dirty blond hair. It ends with a bang, too. Viktor Tsoi, legendary frontman of Russian rock band Kino, strides onto the screen to sing his famous anthem ‘Peremen!’ –…

Eva Rosenthal | 22/06/2018
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Event Review: Ukrainian 1930s avant-garde taking the stage in London – meet the team behind ‘Maklena’ and become part of the story!

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Armed secret police were everywhere during the dress rehearsal for Maklena Grasa – in the dressing rooms with the actors, in the wings and members of the notorious Cheka were crammed into every seat of the theatre. Written by Mykola Kulish in 1933, Maklena Grasa was seen as a deviation of Soviet Ukrainian culture by the Soviet…

Alison Miller | 25/05/2018
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‘Youth on the March!’ Kino Klassika REVIEW: ‘We’ll live ‘til Monday’ (Rostotsky, 1968)

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In Stanislav Rostotsky’s 1968 film We’ll live ‘til Monday, screened last week at the Regent Street Cinema as part of Kino Klassika’s ‘Youth on the March!’ film season, three schoolteachers play out hopes and regrets in midst of an atmosphere of youthful rebellion. English teacher Natasha’s young and idealistic, and deeply in love with her…

Eva Rosenthal | 15/05/2018
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FILM REVIEW: Jiří Brdečka: Master of Czech Animation – ‘unique and unlike anything ever put on screen’

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To celebrate the fantastic world of filmmaker Jiří Brdečka (1917-1982), one of the founding fathers of Czech animation, the Czech Centre London and Limonádový Joe s.r.o. organised a screening of eight of Brdečka’s short animations at Regent Street Cinema, followed by a Q&A with the artist’s daughter, Tereza Brdečková. Brdečka’s talents ranged from journalism to…

Juno Schwarz | 08/05/2018
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ROFILMFEST Review: Charleston (Cretulescu, 2017) – ‘a visual and emotional delight’

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Ioana’s in a coffee shop taking a call, she leaves in a hurry and then disappears around a corner.  There’s a screech of brakes and the sound of a collision. Subsequently, we see a man at a graveside leaving flowers.  A few weeks after his wife’s buried, the man, Alexandru, turns 42.  Alone in his apartment…

Alison Miller | 30/04/2018