Viktor Tsoi

‘Youth on the March’ KinoKlassika Review: ‘Assa’ (Solovev, 1987) – ‘a fight to the death between young and old, corrupt and innocent’

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Assa starts with a bang: a sequence of spellbinding opening credits in lurid pink playing over footage of two drummers, skinny youths in tatty clothes and dirty blond hair. It ends with a bang, too. Viktor Tsoi, legendary frontman of Russian rock band Kino, strides onto the screen to sing his famous anthem ‘Peremen!’ –…

Eva Rosenthal | 22/06/2018
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Event Review: Ukrainian 1930s avant-garde taking the stage in London – meet the team behind ‘Maklena’ and become part of the story!

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Armed secret police were everywhere during the dress rehearsal for Maklena Grasa – in the dressing rooms with the actors, in the wings and members of the notorious Cheka were crammed into every seat of the theatre. Written by Mykola Kulish in 1933, Maklena Grasa was seen as a deviation of Soviet Ukrainian culture by the Soviet…

Alison Miller | 25/05/2018
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‘Youth on the March!’ Kino Klassika REVIEW: ‘We’ll live ‘til Monday’ (Rostotsky, 1968)

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In Stanislav Rostotsky’s 1968 film We’ll live ‘til Monday, screened last week at the Regent Street Cinema as part of Kino Klassika’s ‘Youth on the March!’ film season, three schoolteachers play out hopes and regrets in midst of an atmosphere of youthful rebellion. English teacher Natasha’s young and idealistic, and deeply in love with her…

Eva Rosenthal | 15/05/2018
Metamorpheus (1969)

FILM REVIEW: Jiří Brdečka: Master of Czech Animation – ‘unique and unlike anything ever put on screen’

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To celebrate the fantastic world of filmmaker Jiří Brdečka (1917-1982), one of the founding fathers of Czech animation, the Czech Centre London and Limonádový Joe s.r.o. organised a screening of eight of Brdečka’s short animations at Regent Street Cinema, followed by a Q&A with the artist’s daughter, Tereza Brdečková. Brdečka’s talents ranged from journalism to…

Juno Schwarz | 08/05/2018
Serban Pavlu, Radu Iacoban © Versatile

ROFILMFEST Review: Charleston (Cretulescu, 2017) – ‘a visual and emotional delight’

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Ioana’s in a coffee shop taking a call, she leaves in a hurry and then disappears around a corner.  There’s a screech of brakes and the sound of a collision. Subsequently, we see a man at a graveside leaving flowers.  A few weeks after his wife’s buried, the man, Alexandru, turns 42.  Alone in his apartment…

Alison Miller | 30/04/2018
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ROFILMFEST REVIEW: Ana, Mon Amour (Netzer, 2017)

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The advertising material played before the start of Ana Mon Amour said Romania couldn’t make bad movies. Although tongue in cheek, it shows the confidence of the Romanian New Wave that’s enjoyed a sustainable wind for some time now.Ana Mon Amour is one of the latest offerings of this movement – and the film’s director…

Camelia Ciobanu | 25/04/2018

KINOTEKA REVIEW: ‘The Jester’ (Green and Nowina-Przybylsk, 1937) – a brilliant mixture of imaginative theatre and Yiddish family life

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The Jester, a Polish movie in Yiddish co-directed by Joseph Green and Jan Nowina-Przybylsk in 1937 and restored by the National Center for Jewish Film in 2008, transports us into the world of a vibrant Yiddish culture, values and humour prior to the First World War. The black-and-white movie narrates a romantic tale set against…

Yulia Tosheva-Haggard | 05/04/2018
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CINEMATHEQUE REVIEW: ‘The Fixer’ (2016) – a transformative experience not to be missed!

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Romania’s foreign-language submission for the 2018 Academy Awards, The Fixer had its British premiere this month at the Romanian Cultural Institute in London as part of Cinematheque, a monthly programme that focuses on promoting Romanian cinema. The movie comes out of the Romanian neo-realist cinema tradition that recently claimed prizes at Cannes and Berlin (Cristi…

Camelia Ciobanu | 27/03/2018